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On the original use of Sanskrit as a ver- nacular tongue ; on the manner in which the Praknts arose out 3f it, and on the period of their formation : views of'Pi Nfessors Weber, Aufrecht, Lassen, and Benfey.

Seasons for supposing that the Sanskrit was originally a spoken language 1 .

In ordinary Prakrit it would perhaps be suaro or s'uaro.

Various stages of Sanskrit literature, and the different forms in which, they exhibit the Sanskrit language: the later Yedic commentators: earlier ex- pounders : the Mrukta : the Brahmanas : the Vedic hymns : imperfect comprehension of them in later times ( from changes in the language : the hymns composed in i the vernacular idiom of their age. 1If Vararuchi gives the form vachchho, not vuchchha, which I find in the Mrichh., p. 12 Ruksha is given in "Wilson's dictionary as one of the Sanskrit words for a tree ; but it may have crept in from Prakrit. 13 This word is from the S'akarika, one of the Apabhrans'a dialects.

MEMBER Or' THE GERMAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY, AND FOREIGN MEMBER OP THE LEYP. (All rights eserved.j ITFORT) : PRINTED BY STE&IEN AUSTIN AND SON*. 1 MY primary object in this volume, as in its predecessor, has been to produce a work which may assist the 13- searches of those Hindus who desire to investigate critically the origin and history of their nation, and of their national literature, religion, and institutions ; and may facilitate the operations of those European teachers whose business it is to communicate to the Hindus the results of modern inquiry on the various subjects here examined. to the Oriental scholar) is, for the most part, either a com- pilation, or, at the ! The" obligations under which I lie to the different authors, whose labours have furnished the chief mate- rials of che volume, have been, in most instances, so fully acknowledged in detail in the following pages, that it is not necessary for me to allude to thun here more par- ti^ularly.

INQTTTRY WHETHER THE HINDUS ARE OF TRANS-HIMALAYAN ORIGIN, AND AKIN 10 THE WESTERN . SECOND EDITION, REVISE r- tin LONDON: TRUBNER & CO,, 8 AND 60, PATERNOSTE is r . In -this way I may have succeeded in contributing a small proportion of original matter to the discussion , ol some of the interesting topics which ha-ve come under review. The dialect of the Buddhist Gatfias, and its relation to the Pali : Summary of the results of this and thf^receding section.

10 The Persian has the same form, with a b instead of the v.

a different language and religion, already in occu- pation" of those tracts, the probability that they did not grow t up in India, alongside of these alie:; tribes, acquires addi.tienal force. From the fact (established both by philological considerations, and by the testimony of the SQtfth-Indian grammarians) that the Dravidian languages are essentially distinct from Sanskrit, is argued that the people by whom the former class of languages were THE FIRST EDITION. before the Brahmanical invasion of the Dekhan) must have belonged to a raca which had no affinity to the Sanskrit-speaking Aryas; and could not, therefore, as Manu asserts, have been degrs^ed Kshatriyas. I owe it to the kindness df Professor Goldstiicker that I am able to adduce the extracts from the Nyaya mala'vistara, in pp. 1 ,' Burnouf, Lassen, Cowell, Campbell, Ellis, Caldwell, Clough, Tumour, Fausboll, Rajendralal Mitra, H: H.

Nearly alt the Sanskrit texts in this Yolume have been t taken from printed editions. edition are jjfincipally the" following : the Comparative Tables of Words in pp.

The quotations from those parts of the Eigveda which have not yet appeared in ( Pcofessor Miiller's edition, havf? copy in my possession, alludod to in the Preface to the First Volume.

In order to obtain a basis for carrying out the philo- logical portion of this argument, viz., for comparing the priginal language of the Hindus with those of the Per- sians, Greeks, and Latins, it became necessary for me to prove that the Sanskrit, which is now a learned language only, was at one time spoken by tfy3 ancestors of the Hindus. XI account is given of these earlier vernaculars, viz. Campbell's Telugu Grammar (including the important note by Mr. I then endeavour to show how the results obtained in this Chapter, viz,, (1) that the Aryas, when living in the \Panja JE), came into conflict with an-, alien race called Dasyus ; (2) that the Aryas can be shown from their own boojis to have at first occupied only the north-west of India and then to have advanced gradually to the east and south, and last of all to have crossed the Yindhya range into the Dekhan ; and (3) that the original languages of the south of the peninsula are distinct from Sanskrit, how, I say, these results har- monize with, or corroborate, thfe theory that the Hindus, or Indo-Arians, are Hot" autochthonous, but immigrated into Hindustan from tn& north-west. % 445488), and the "Additions and Corrections " contain^ some further illustrations of the subjects discussed fa the body of the work, and in a few cases supply some modifications of the text, which closer research has rendered necessary. "Wilson, "Weber, Miiller, Goldstiicker, Roth, Benfey, Bopp, Kuhn, A. Schlegel, Pictet, Spiegel, Haug, Whitney, "Windischmann, Langlpis, Renan, Curzon, and i Elphinstone. Beames, Childers, D'AIwis, Aufrecht, Curtius,- Yullers, j Schleicher, Tick, Crawfurd, Huxley, and G.

This I have attempted to do in the First Chapter (pp. (1) the Prakrits, of which specimens are to be 'found in the different Hindu dramas, and which seem to have existed as spoken dialects, at least from the commencement of the Christian era, until they became merged n the modern vernaculars; (2) the Pali, or sacred language of the Buddhist books of Ceylon and Burmah,-" which appears to represent one of the provincial dialects , In the 1 Third Chapter, (pp. 359369) contains a selection of passages from the Bigveda, in which' the Aryas and the Dasyus are distinguished from one another, and reference is made to the enmity exist- ing between the two. 369396) supplies a further collection of Yedic texts bearing upon the relations of the Aryas and Dasyus, and the characteristics of the latter as degraded, dark- complexioned, irreligious, neglecters G, sacrifice, etc, There are, indeed, other texts, in which thes6 Dasyus are regarded as demons, and this creates a difficulty. 423438) supplies a variety of details, derived from Mr. In the notes towards the close of the Volume, and in the Appendices, the Sanskrit passages have been printed in tne Italic character. Rawlinson, from whose writings or communications I have derived valuable assistance in augmenting my materials, or re- vising different portions of the work. ; as we'i as the statements of Gatha and "* N Vedic forms in pp.

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Thus the Hindi and Mahratti word banjh, a barren woman, is formed from the Sanskrit bandhya, in the same way as sanjh 'jomes from sandhya ; and as in the latter case we find the earlier Prakrit form to have been sanjha, so we may suppose the older Prakrit form of banjh to have been banj'ha, or vanjha.

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