Facts on dating abuse

TDV may include sexual violence including any kind of unwanted or forced sexual contact.

Sexual control may also include reproductive coercion where an abuser sabotages his partner’s birth control, forces pregnancy and/or determines the outcome of the victim’s pregnancies.

In this page we use “dating” as an inclusive term covering the range of adolescent romantic relationships ranging from casual, episodic encounters to longer-term, committed relationships. TDV can include physical abuse—things like hitting, pushing, slapping, or strangling a dating partner.

Digital abuse includes the use of cell phones, messaging, social networks or the internet to harm, control, harass, manipulate, intimidate, monitor or embarrass another person.

Once a message or image is sent, the sender no longer has control over that content.

Private communication is very easily made public through digital networks.

According to the National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline, teen dating violence (TDV) is a pattern of behavior that someone uses to gain control over his or her dating partner.

It is also important to note that “dating” is a term that adults tend to use to identify romantic relationships between young people; accordingly, that’s the term that we use in describing these dynamics on this page.

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